By Jing Wang –

On July 25th I arrived in Sydney, Australia with great excitement for my 1-week trip providing face-to-face key user training for a Global Digital Transformation and DAM project on behalf of one of ICP’s clients.

Background of My Trip
As a DAM Change Manager, my colleagues and I are working with a major organisation to help it roll out its digital transformation strategy worldwide. Its DAM system is a starting point and is going to be the single trusted source for all digital assets scaling across brands and markets on a global basis.


The Sydney Harbour Bridge – climbed it and overcame my acrophobia!

What I do as a DAM Change Manager
The DAM rollout project for Australia kicked off this April. Since then, I have been involved in engaging with senior leadership and key stakeholders. This proactive change management approach helped us secure a team of executive sponsors who are committed to spending dedicated time on implementing the digital change. Our experience shows that by enabling ownership up front, a DAM rollout project gets the best results in the end.

Starting on the right foot, I work closely with the market business analysts to support business gap analysis and as-is vs. to-be process mapping, understanding the existing workflows and assessing how the new processes align. For instance, weekly catch up meetings are scheduled to understand the eCommerce business workflow of the Australia market, what are they struggling with on their existing DAM, what are the essential requirements of a new DAM and how the new solution can deliver better transparency and control over upstream partners and downstream e-retailers in a time-efficient manner.

Based on the business analysis, my daily change management work is to gather, plan and prioritise available resources for user, data and asset migration. This migration process is an area where I assess scope volumes vs. time requirements, come up with feasible and flexible approaches of retrieving historical assets from legacy systems, migrating assets along with retaining metadata in the new DAM and on-boarding existing users to ensure the smooth transition between the old and new business and technical processes.

Apart from the above, a key role of a Change Manager is to deliver face-to-face key user training, as well as provide support during market fitness testing (especially when the DAM is being rolled out alongside other integrated systems) and act as the Subject Matter Expert (SME). My training sessions were customised to meet the needs of key users (most of them are from marketing and eCommerce teams) and the specific eCommerce workflows of the Australia market. As a DAM Change Manager, sitting down with influential key users (whose adoption will best enable early success on the DAM) is an invaluable opportunity to gather first hand feedback, to define ongoing user support processes and best practice learnings after the DAM is ‘live’ for Australia. My trip in Australia achieved all of these objectives.

After more than four months since kick-off, the Australia market has officially completed its ‘on-boarding’ phase and stepped into ‘business as usual’, with a brand new and more streamlined end-to-end eCommerce solution.

For a successful DAM, user adoption is not a one-time event. Early adopters can fall away. As the Change Manager is responsible for on-boarding the Australia market from day one, my next agenda is to carry out a smooth hand-over to my colleagues on the Global Librarian team (who provide ongoing user support of the DAM). This will ensure consistent and quality user support throughout the on-boarding, launching and business as usual phases for our client’s Australia eCommerce market.

Acting as ‘Ambassadors’ for our client’s digital transformation and DAM project, we are not there for the glory of launching the DAM, but we do pride ourselves (quietly) in knowing that we help making things work as a whole.

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